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HGV Drivers / Licence



HGV/LGV Licence information and Categories
There are a number of differing HGV licences, depending on the size and weight of the vehicles, find out here what you are entitled to drive.

Large Goods Vehicle (LGV) or Heavy Goods Vehicle (HGV)

There are a number of differing HGV licences, depending on the size and weight of the vehicle. The following information should make it easier for you to make an informed choice on the best way for you to acquire your HGV licence in accordance with your personal circumstances. From the vehicle requirements and age restrictions to descriptions of the theory and practical tests, we have all the information to help you find the best way of passing your HGV driving test.

A large goods vehicle (LGV), is the formal generic term in the European Union for goods motor vehicles (i.e. trucks / lorries) with a maximum allowed mass (MAM) or gross combination mass (GCM) of over 3.5 tonnes - 3,500 kilograms.

The former term heavy goods vehicle (HGV) is still very commonly used. The term was changed from heavy goods vehicle to large goods vehicle - as not all countries in Europe had a word for ’heavy’ with the same uniform contextual meaning.


The different catagories of LGV Licence are:


C1 - Rigid goods vehicle between 3500kg and 7500 kg towing a trailer up to 750kg

C1 + E - As for category C1 but towing a trailer over 750kg - total weight not more than 12000kg

C - Rigid goods vehicle over 7500kg towing a trailer up to 750kg

C + E - As for category C but towing a trailer over 750kg

For Licence categories click here
For Age requirements click here

The cost of getting your licence?


Detailed below are the estimated costs that you will incur when learning to drive a Class C or Class C+E vehicle

Category C (Class 2) Licence

Procedure undertaken Cost
Medical £50-£100
Convert your Class B (Car) Licence to a Class C (LGV Rigid) Provisional Free
Theory Test £35
Hazard Perception Test £15
Class C Training £600-£1000
Class C Driving Test £115-£141
Convert your Class C (LGV Rigid) Provisional to a Full Class C (LGV Rigid) Free
Total £815-£1291

Remember you need a Full Class C licence before you can pass your Class C+E Test

Category C+E (Class 1) Licence

Procedure undertaken Cost
Convert your Full Class C (LGV Rigid) Licence to a Class C+E (LGV artic) Provisional Free
Class C+E Training £600-£1000
Class C+E Driving Test £115-£141
Convert your Class C+E (LGV artic) Provisional to a Full Class C+E (LGV artic) Licence Free
Total £715-£1141

Driver CPC

Procedure undertaken Cost
Driver CPC theory test case studies £30
Driver CPC Practical Test (includes automated issue of Driver Qualification Card (DQC) £55-£63
Total £85-£93


Car & Trailer Category C1+E

New Laws that affect this Licence
This licence category will allow you to drive a 7.5 tonne vehicle towing a trailer that exceeds 750kgs.

If you passed your car driving test prior to January 1997 then you will have gained a C1+E licence but this will be restricted to trailers not weighing more than 750kgs (Total train weight of vehicle and trailer can not exceed 8250kgs). If you are required to tow trailers that exceed 750kgs then you will be required to take a C1+E course and test, on passing the test you will be able to tow trailers up to 4500kgs (Total train weight of vehicle and trailer can not exceed 12000kgs). Although you may have the Category C1+E on your current licence you will be required to have a medical to comply with current licensing legislation, apply for a provisional C1+E licence and take a theory test. Once your provisional licence has been approved and returned to you your theory test can be arranged, the theory test is made up of two parts; the multiple-choice part and the hazard perception part. The multiple choice part is delivered using a touch screen computer monitor and a mouse for the hazard perception part, the computer records your responses through the use of a computer mouse button.

You need to pass both parts to pass the theory test. If you pass one part and fail the other you will fail the whole test, and you will need to take both parts again.

If you passed your car driving test after January 1997 you will have to take a category C1 course and test before progressing on to category C1+E. In order to take a Category C1 course you will be required to undertake a medical examination to comply with the higher medical regulations that this licence category requires which we can arrange for you. Once you have had your medical you will need to apply for your provisional vocational licence.

Once your licence has been approved and returned to you your theory test can be arranged, the theory test is made up of two parts; the multiple-choice part and the hazard perception part. The multiple choice part is delivered using a touch screen computer monitor and a mouse for the hazard perception part, the computer records your responses through the use of a computer mouse button.

You need to pass both parts to pass the theory test. If you pass one part and fail the other you will fail the whole test, and you will need to take both parts again.

Category C

Part one - multiple choice


Before the test starts you will be given instructions on how the test works.

You can also choose to go through a practice session of the multiple-choice questions to get used to the layout of the test. At the end of the practice session the real test will begin.

A question and several answer options will appear onscreen and you have to select the correct answer to the question by touching the screen or using the mouse. Some questions may require more than one answer.

You will be asked 60 questions in 40 minutes. You can navigate between questions and ’flag’ questions that you want to come back to later in the test.

The pass mark for the multiple-choice part of the theory test is 51 out of 60.

After the multiple choice part you can choose to have a break of up to three minutes before the hazard perception part starts.

Part two - hazard perception


After the break you will then be shown a short tutorial video clip about how the hazard perception part works.

The hazard perception part is also delivered on a computer but you respond by clicking a button on the mouse. You will be presented with a series of 14 video clips that feature every day road scenes. In each clip there will be at least one developing hazard, but one of the clips will feature two developing hazards.

To achieve a high score you will need to respond to the developing hazard during the early part of its development. The maximum you can score on each hazard is five. You will not be able to review your answers to the hazard perception test; as on the road, you will only have. one chance to respond to the developing hazard. The pass mark for the hazard perception part of the theory test is 50 out of 75.

Part two -The Practical Test

You must show:


Before getting into the cab, you must demonstrate that you can carry out safety checks:

• Are your number plates securely fitted?
• Is you load secure? If you have a box trailer, is it closed securely? If you have a flatbed, if it has a load or load restraints on it, are they secure?
• Are all bulbs, lenses and reflectors fitted?
• Are all reflective plates clean and visible?
• Are the tyres safe to go out on the road? Look for trapped elements, bulges, cuts and grooves

Before you do these safety checks, get into the cab. Ensure that:

• The handbrake is securely on
• The engine is off
• All electrical systems are off
• Windows are closed and doors are securely closed
• The gear lever is in neutral
• The keys have been removed from the ignition
• You will not endanger anyone when you open the door

Complete your initial safety checks. Then you will need to switch the engine on to carry out more safety checks. Ensure that:

• The handbrake is applied
• The gear lever is in neutral
• The doors are closed properly
• Your seat is adjusted to suit you
• The mirrors are correctly aligned
• Your seat belt is fastened correctly and securely.
• You should check that all bulbs are functional. You may have to start the engine for this. Discuss this with your instructor.
• You should make sure you have used a tachograph.
• You must show reasonable car for other road users. Not all understand the larger turning circles required by an LGV.
• You must be able to demonstrate the ability to adapt your driving to the varying weather conditions.

The following is a brief outline of what you will have to demonstrate in your test.

• Move off:
• Straight ahead
• At an angle
• On level ground
• Uphill
• Downhill
• Drive in the correct lane on roads and in the correct driving position within that lane
• Effectively observe what is around you
• Drive at an appropriate speed for the surroundings, the weather and the law
• Anticipate changes in the traffic
• Pass stationary vehicles
• Overtake vehicles
• Turn left or right, or drive straight ahead at:
• Junctions
• Roundabouts
• Crossroads
• Keep a safe distance from the vehicle in front
• Act correctly at pedestrian crossings and when instructed by signs
• Drive in a safe manor
• Drive on:
• Urban roads
• Rural roads
• Dual carriageways
• Stop the vehicle safely
• Stop correctly when instructed.
• Stop when the emergency stop command is given (this must be safely, as quick as possible and under full control)
• Reverse under full control in a manoeuvring area
• Cross level crossings and tram crossings (where applicable)

The main thing is to display a safe and knowledgeable front about your vehicle. If you can demonstrate that you can safely handle an LGV, you will pass.

Category C+E

To obtain this licence you must have first taken the lower category C licence, you will not need to pass a theory test as this would have been done either at Category C1 or Category C stage, if you obtained your category C licence prior to January 1997 then you are also exempt from the theory test.

The test will be similar to your Class C test but will also include:

•An ’S’ shaped reverse into a bay
•A braking exercise
•Demonstrating the uncoupling and re-coupling procedure if you’re taking a test with a trailer
•Gear-change exercise

The drive on the road last about 60 minutes and the overall test takes about 90 minutes. During the driving test the examiner will give you directions which you should follow. Test routes are designed to be as uniform as possible and will include a range of typical road and traffic conditions.

Throughout the test you should drive in the way your instructor has taught you. If you make a mistake, don’t worry about it, it might be a less serious driving fault and may not affect your result. The examiner will be looking for an overall safe standard of driving.

You can make up to 15 driving faults and still pass the test (16 or more results in failure). However, if you commit one serious or dangerous fault you will fail the test. If at any time your examiner considers you to be a danger to other road users your test will be stopped.


Periodic Driver CPC


Periodic training for current LGV and PCV licence holders

ALL
truck (LGV) drivers will have to gain this qualification by completing 35 hours of training
(5 days) before Sept 2014.

Licence categories are: C1, C1+E, C, C+E